Staff Covid-19 infection scenarios

Member of staff has symptoms of a respiratory infection, including Covid-19, and has not taken a Covid-19 test:

  • If a member of staff has symptoms of a respiratory infection, such as Covid-19, and they have a high temperature or do not feel well enough to go to work or carry out normal activities, they should try to stay at home (speak with the school about options available) and avoid contact with other people, until they no longer have a high temperature (if they had one) or until they no longer feel unwell.
  • It is particularly important to avoid close contact with anyone who is at higher risk of becoming seriously unwell if they are infected with Covid-19 and other respiratory infections, especially those whose immune system means that they are at higher risk of serious illness, despite vaccination.
  • If attending a medical or dental appointment in person, contact the healthcare provider and let them know about your symptoms.
  • Friends, family or neighbours may be asked to get food and other essentials for you.

The following actions will reduce the chance of passing on your infection to others:

  • Wearing a well-fitting face covering made with multiple layers or a surgical face mask.
  • Avoiding crowded places such as public transport, large social gatherings, or anywhere that is enclosed or poorly ventilated.
  • Taking any exercise outdoors in places where you will not have close contact with other people.
  • Covering your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze; wash your hands frequently with soap and water for 20 seconds or use hand sanitiser after coughing, sneezing and blowing your nose and before you eat or handle food; avoid touching your face.

The following actions will reduce the spread of infection in your household:

  • Try to keep your distance from people you live with.
  • In shared areas wear a well-fitting face covering made with multiple layers or a surgical face mask, especially if you live with people whose immune system means that they are at higher risk of serious illness, despite vaccination.
  • Ventilate rooms you have been in by opening windows and leaving them open for at least 10 minutes after you have left the room.
  • Wash your hands regularly and cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing
  • Regularly clean frequently touched surfaces, such as door handles and remote controls, and shared areas such as kitchens and bathrooms.
  • Advise anyone that does need to come into your home that you have symptoms, so they can take precautions to protect themselves such as wearing a well-fitting face covering or a surgical face mask, keeping their distance if they can, and washing their hands regularly.
  • GermDefence is a website that can help you identify simple ways to protect yourself and others in your household from Covid-19 and other viruses.

Member of staff has tested positive for Covid-19:

  • If you have a positive COVID-19 test result, try to stay at home (speak with the school about options available) and avoid contact with other people for 5 days after the day you took your test. At the end of this period, if you have a high temperature or feel unwell, try to follow this advice until you feel well enough to resume normal activities and you no longer have a high temperature if you had one.
  • It is particularly important to avoid close contact (for 10 days after the day you took your test) with anyone who is at higher risk of becoming seriously unwell if they are infected with Covid-19 especially those whose immune system means that they are at higher risk of serious illness, despite vaccination.
  • If attending a medical or dental appointment in person, contact the healthcare provider and let them know about your symptoms.
  • Friends, family or neighbours may be asked to get food and other essentials for you.

The following actions will reduce the chance of passing on your infection to others:

  • Wearing a well-fitting face covering made with multiple layers or a surgical face mask.
  • Avoiding crowded places such as public transport, large social gatherings, or anywhere that is enclosed or poorly ventilated.
  • Taking any exercise outdoors in places where you will not have close contact with other people.
  • Covering your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze; wash your hands frequently with soap and water for 20 seconds or use hand sanitiser after coughing, sneezing and blowing your nose and before you eat or handle food; avoid touching your face.

The following actions will reduce the spread of infection in your household:

  • Try to keep your distance from people you live with.
  • In shared areas wear a well-fitting face covering made with multiple layers or a surgical face mask, especially if you live with people whose immune system means that they are at higher risk of serious illness, despite vaccination.
  • Ventilate rooms you have been in by opening windows and leaving them open for at least 10 minutes after you have left the room.
  • Wash your hands regularly and cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing
  • Regularly clean frequently touched surfaces, such as door handles and remote controls, and shared areas such as kitchens and bathrooms.
  • Advise anyone that does need to come into your home that you have symptoms, so they can take precautions to protect themselves such as wearing a well-fitting face covering or a surgical face mask, keeping their distance if they can, and washing their hands regularly.
  • GermDefence is a website that can help you identify simple ways to protect yourself and others in your household from Covid-19 and other viruses.

Staff member of a close contact of someone who has had a positive test result for Covid-19:

  • People who live in the same household as someone with Covid-19 are at the highest risk of becoming infected because they are most likely to have prolonged close contact. People who stayed overnight in the household of someone with Covid-19 while they were infectious are also at high risk.
  • If you are a household or overnight contact of someone who has had a positive Covid-19 test result it can take up to 10 days for your infection to develop. It is possible to pass on Covid-19 to others, even if you have no symptoms.

You can reduce the risk to other people by taking the following steps:

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Last updated: 13 Apr 2022

Ealing Learning Partnership (ELP) directorate and associates

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